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Transgrid Haymarket
PROJECTS  /  Transgrid Haymarket

Transgrid Haymarket

Location:
Haymarket
Type:
Office
Year:
2014
Architect:
Bates Smart
Project Manager:
Built
Brookfield Multiplex
Consultant:
Slattery
Surface Design
Enstruct
Photographer:
Brett Boardman

Five years ago 180 Thomas Street, Haymarket Sydney was a four-storey brick plinth with cumbersome structural columns and a central lift core, not the most exciting building nor the easiest to redevelop.

In 2014 the building opens its doors with an extra nine-storeys of 5 Star Green Star Office As Built V3 rated offices, thanks to Bates Smart Architects and a City of Sydney design excellence competition, allowing the company to extend the building's bheight and floor space ratio six metres beyond the existing podium.

Currently residing in the building is TransGrid, a company that owns and operates the NSW high voltage electricity transmission network.

Located on a prominent corner in the heart of Sydney’s bustling Haymarket, Bates Smart has designed a building that will enliven the adjacent Ultimo Pedestrian Network by creating a public plaza that extends the public domain,  by expressing the building’s vertical movement in a landmark glass volume.

The building is a steel framed construction with external glass lifts and an extensively glazed façade. Each horizontal layer is expressed by a differentiated solar shading system. The result has created a layered effect of stacked, linear boxes.

Located on a prominent corner in the heart of Sydney’s bustling Haymarket, the 180 Thomas Street project was won through a City of Sydney Design Excellence Competition. The design achieved bonus height and FSR on the basis of design excellence.

The new commercial development and integrated workplace has responded to challenging site restrictions and a rapidly evolving urban context to deliver a worthy addition to Sydney’s fast-emerging architectural precinct of Haymarket.

The design challenge was to build on top of an existing building which had columns and a central lift core integrated into its original design restricting floorplate flexibility and reducing connectivity. Our solution was to place a series of steel transfer trusses on top of the existing structure. This allowed the floor plate to cantilever beyond the existing building, increasing the floor area and aligning with the street wall while also providing flexibility with the column grid.

A steel structure was chosen to avoid increasing the load on the existing structure. The lifts were relocated to the exterior of the building and enclosed in a vertical glass volume to express the building’s vertical movement while enlivening the Ultimo Pedestrian Network.  

Bates Smart Project Director, Philip Vivian commented on the design form:

"Located diagonally across from the new Frank Gehry UTS building, the design needed a strong presence. The architectural form reinterprets the semi-industrial linear forms of historic Haymarket to create a contemporary building that respects the diverse scale and context of the area.

"The form is articulated into a series of seemingly random, stacked, horizontal volumes of varying heights. Each horizontal layer is expressed by a different solar shading system, creating a layered effect of stacked, linear boxes." 

The lobby is a transparent glass volume beneath the building, between the lifts and original structure. A dramatic public artwork by Lucas Grogan on the building wall frames the lobby.  

The building has achieved a 5 Star Green Star rating, incorporating passive solar shading, and chilled beam cooling. 

- See more at: http://journal.batessmart.com.au/#sthash.bRnIfF4X.dpufThis form is articulated into a series of seemingly random, stacked, horizontal volumes of varying heights

The existing structure was originally designed to accept future development and six trusses weighing a total of over 120 tonne will be mounted on struts on the existing roof to support the new works

The brief given to Bates Smart was no less than an aspirational workspace to promote collaboration, cohesion and increased transparency. As this was a relocation project to unite previously dispersed business units it was paramount that the space was an equitable and collegiate work environment.

Briefing and image reponse sessions confirmed that the space had to satisfy demand for increased workplace flexibility without losing functional efficiency. Elements of fluidity, movement and illumination were reinforced to suit TransGrid's core bussiness.
In this location it provides privacy between the office floor and the adjoining residential building, as well as creating a large, open
and flexible floorplate that maximizes the prime views.

The reception area is flanked by reclaimed timber power poles that connect wires vertically and horizontally creating vistas through to the work areas.

With expansive floorplates it was possible to break down the space on both vertical and horizontal perspectives, allowing business units to connect and yet be independent at the same time. An offset void and staircase across all three levels gives a backdrop of energy and movement; the void is framed by more timber battens from reclaimed timber power poles.

A naturally ventilated wintergarden is located at the northern end of the building, its double height capitalising on premium views and light. This social and informal meeting place allows the business to come together as a whole and is well used by the staff.

The success of this project has been established in the way the staff have embraced their new workspace as well as connect with each other across the business. Silos have been removed, transparency increased and a greater sense of equality has been achieved. The project is one of a handful to have achieved a 6 Star Green Star 'As Built' rating by the Green Building Council of Australia, this represents 'World Leadership' in environmentally sustainable construction.

TransGrid's new office comprises of 3 levels of fitout, and construction of a 9-level tower including a complex interface between the old and new structures and the construction of six, 25-tonne structural steel trusses at the base of the tower. The project marked an unprecedented milestone for the team: obtaining a 5 Star Green Star rating for the base building after a first-round submission to the Green Building Council.

Our efforts were recognised with an MBA award for Excellence in Resource Efficiency, open Price Category. The project also won a PCA Innovation & Excellence Award for Best Workplace Project.

As a national leader in the infrastructure sector, our client required no less than an inspirational work space to promote collaboration, cohesion and increased transparency. This was a relocation project to unite previously dispersed business units into an equitable and collegiate work environment.

Strategic briefing and image response sessions were extensive, and confirmed that the space had to satisfy demand for increased workplace flexibility without losing functional efficiency.

Elements of fluidity, movement and illumination referenced in the design give a subtle nod to the national grid and TransGrid’s core business. The reception area is flanked by reclaimed timber poles that connect wires vertically and horizontally, creating vistas through to the work areas.

With expansive floor plates, it was possible to break down the space on both vertical and horizontal perspectives and thus allow business units to connect and yet be independent at the same time. An offset void and staircase across all three levels gives a backdrop of energy and movement; the void is framed by more timber battens from reclaimed timber power poles.

A naturally ventilated wintergarden is located at the northern end of the building, its double height capitalising on premium views and light. This social and informal meeting place allows the business to come together as whole and is well used by the staff.

The success of this project has been established in the way the staff have embraced their new work space as well as connect with each other across the business. Silos have been removed, transparency increased and a greater sense of equality has been achieved.

Built completed a three-level high-end fitout for TransGrid with works integrated into the construction of 180 Thomas St. The finished tenancy surpassed its 5 Star Green Star Interiors target becoming one of a handful of projects to achieve a 6 Star Green Star 'As Built' rating, and the first project in NSW to achieve this rating in a Round 1 submission to the Green Building Council of Australia. The fitout won a Master Builder’s Award for Excellence in Resource Efficiency as well as the Sustainability Advancement Award at the Australian Interior Design Awards. The project was also recognised with a PCA Innovation & Excellence Award for Best Workplace Project.

The fitout was designed with a holistic consideration to sustainability, from indoor environment quality to water conservation, reduced energy use through lighting control and chilled beams. From thoughtful supply chain procurement to its very location in a building undergoing transformation through the adaptive reuse of a piece of city infrastructure, the project achieved a reduced impact on the local and global environment.

A two-storey wintergarden on the north of the floorplate creates an enviable green space for TransGrid’s employees. An operable glazed louvre façade provides fresh air when activated by the Building Management System promoting an optimal sense of a healthy indoor environment. This space not only functions as the main kitchen and cafeteria area, it also doubles as informal meeting space and breakout work area encouraging greater staff interaction.

An interconnecting stair forms the centrepiece of the fitout, creating visual and physical connectivity between the different levels with glazed balustrades to increase natural light and further promote visual connectivity. Recycled power poles, stainless steel cabling & feature lighting compliment the fitout’s exposed services and reflect the client’s commercial activities as a distributer of high voltage power.

CSM collaborated with Bates Smart to compose an office space for TransGrid that was required to be aesthetcially pleasing whilst also being functional in relation to storage options. This contemporary office renovation in Sydney’s Haymarket region needed to reflect the company’s activity based workplace ideals.

CSM was able to customise their Evolution Sliding Door Cabinets to effectively fulfil this brief. These cabinets were produced in numerous different sizes to suit the space, and were tailored further by the additions of perforations, shelving, telescopic arms and coat rails for TransGrid personnel. CSM’s Evolution Planter Boxes were also provided to enhance the aesthetics of the work environment.

After many years and numerous attempts by other architects Bates Smart’s innovative design unlocked the potential to build over an existing structure. The central lift core was relocated to the perimeter of the building creating an open flexible floorplate. A series of steel trusses allow the building to cantilever over the existing structure and transfer loads.

Expressed as a set of random stacked boxes with contrasting shading strategies this building boldly interprets its diverse context and has created a unique environmental aesthetic.

The original sub-structure included a structural grid and lift core to allow for the future construction of a commercial office building above. No internal modifications could be made. This had several unfortunate consequences. The centrally located lift shaft bisected the floor; and the floor area and structural grid were small by current workplace standards.

Bates Smart’s City of Sydney competition winning design is based on three key innovations to resolve these issues:
1- Relocating the lifts to the exterior of the building opened up the floor plate to create an open, flexible and connected workplace. The new glazed exterior lifts created a spectacular experience when entering the building.
2- Locating steel trusses on the roof of the sub-structure allowed the office structure above to have longer spans. Further it created the opportunity for the building to cantilever beyond the original sub-structure, effectively increasing the floor area.
3- Using lightweight steel frame construction reduced the floor to floor height by incorporating the chilled beam ducts within the structural depth and created the opportunity to accommodate the load of an additional floor.

These design innovations are clearly expressed in the building. The buildings orientation meant horizontal or vertical shading had equal effectiveness. Playfully the building alternates these shading strategies creating the impression of a series of stacked boxes to reduce its scale in the context. The sub-structure was re-clad in precast panels to give it a solid appearance to visually support the new structure over.

The lobby is a glazed box beneath the cantilevered portico. It contains a stunning interpretive artwork by Lucas Grogan consisting of 140,000 glass beads hung in layers.

The base building has achieved Australian Green Building Council accreditations: 5 Star Green Stars for the architecture and the fitout achieved an ‘as built’ 6 Star Green Star Rating.

As a national leader in the infrastructure sector, our client required no less than an aspirational workspace to promote collaboration, cohesion and increased transparency. This was a relocation project to unite previously dispersed business units into an equitable and collegiate work environment.   

Strategic briefing and image response sessions were extensive and confirmed that the space had to satisfy demand for increased workplace flexibility without losing functional efficiency. Elements of fluidity, movement and illumination referenced in the design give a subtle nod to the national grid and TransGrid’s core business.

The reception area is flanked by reclaimed timber power poles that connect wires vertically and horizontally creating vistas through to the work areas. 

With expansive floorplates it was possible to break down the space on both vertical and horizontal perspectives, allowing business units to connect and yet be independent at the same time. An offset void and staircase across all three levels gives a backdrop of energy and movement; the void is framed by more timber battens from reclaimed timber power poles.

A naturally ventilated wintergarden is located at the northern end of the building, its double height capitalising on premium views and light. This social and informal meeting place allows the business to come together as a whole and is well used by the staff.  

The success of this project has been established in the way the staff have embraced their new workspace as well as connect with each other across the business. Silos have been removed, transparency increased and a greater sense of equality has been achieved. The project is one of a handful to have achieved a 6 Star Green Star 'As Built' rating by the Green Building Council of Australia, this represents 'World Leadership' in environmentally sustainable construction.

- See more at: http://journal.batessmart.com.au/#sthash.bRnIfF4X.dpuf

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